German auto-giant BMW might not have put an end to its aspirations on the M2. Back in May when the company launched a better variant of an already brilliant M2, christened as the M2 competition, buyers thought that the line-up would have concluded with it.

However, an internal source from Munich stated that the company might be looking at a CS model as well as a CSL model that would be exclusively sold in the US. These new introductions to the lineup could keep the enthusiasm for the M2 on the boil.

The models can be expected to hit the markets by 2020 if the company gives a green signal for its current plans

The models can be expected to hit the markets by 2020 if the company gives a green signal for its current plans. According to the BMW Blog, The CSL model of the M2 would be manufactured only for a year and would replace the current generation of the M2 in the BMW store.

At the Frankfurt auto show in 2017, the company announced a replacement of its most potent variant of the M models with a track-oriented version, known as the CSL. BMW M chief Frank van at the time had stated that the CSL would be “top-of-the-line track tool, made on the track for the track, just with a number plate.”

At the Frankfurt auto show in 2017, the company announced a replacement of its most potent variant of the M models with a track-oriented version, known as the CSL

In May 2018. the company launched the M2 Competition which was priced slightly higher than the standard M2 but was loaded with a 3.0-litre engine that could be seen on the M3 and the M4 pushing the power from 365 bhp to 405 bhp. The car also came with various add-on options such as the dual-clutch transmission, M Driver’s Package, Moonroof, metallic paint, and Executive Package.

Specifications of either model are unclear. However, taking note of the upgrades that the M4 CS saw from its standard variant, the new M2 CS is likely to get a significant surge in power and a carbon fiber reinforced plastic body for weight reduction.

The article was adapted from an article at Nikkei Asian Review, which you can find here.