After the Trump administration on Thursday proposed to cap the fuel efficiency standards on all passenger vehicles, American auto manufacturer General Motors stated that they were not against the federal fuel efficiency standards, but would like to know what they are as soon as possible.

“We’d like to get clarity as soon as we can, and we’d like to get commonality as soon as we can,” President of GM, Dan Ammann said at a presentation at the Billington Cybersecurity Summit in Detroit on Friday.

Trump’s proposal capped the federal fuel efficiency requirements for passenger vehicles at the 2020 levels of 35 mpg (14.8 kpl) instead of letting them continue to rise to 50 mpg (21.2 kpl) by 2025 set up by the Obama administration.

Ammann claimed that the company's overall goals were to improve fuel economy and eventually make its line-up completely electric.

Audi began Chinese production in 1988, becoming the first foreign luxury brand to do so. But its business there has suffered of late as its dispute with FAW has morphed into a boycott by affiliated dealerships.

China is the most important market for Audi, making up about a third of its global sales. But even as the country’s luxury car market grows, Audi’s sales there increased just 1.1% to 597,000 units in 2017. It was dethroned by Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz, whose sales, including of the Smart brand, surged 27%. And BMW, another compatriot, is catching up with a 15% jump in sales.

The proposal also suggested scrapping the 1975 law which exempted the state of California from Federal standards, allowing it to set its own carbon emission standards which was much higher than the other states.

“We’d really like to get it to one harmonized set of national standards,” he said

Additionally, he also claimed that the company’s overall goals were to improve fuel economy and eventually make its line-up completely electric.

Ammann, however, declined to respond whether the company was against the efficiency cap. Instead, he repeated the fact that it would support the inclusion of California into one national standard.

Starting in 2019, General Motors is planning to launch public ride-hailing with self-driving vehicles that would be void of manual controls such as steering wheels and pedals

Post the discussion according to the Ammann, GM was expecting additional credits for all its electric autonomous vehicles such as its Cruise AV, which is claimed to be highly utilised in a shared environment.

“We think we should be getting more credit for vehicles like that,” he said. “There are some enhancements and changes that could help drive us to the future that we all want.”

Starting in 2019, General Motors is planning to launch public ride-hailing with self-driving vehicles that would be void of manual controls such as steering wheels and pedals.

The article was adapted from an article at Nikkei Asian Review, which you can find here.