Worried automobile industry employees can sigh relief with a recent data regarding the usage on automated machines recently released by Bloomberg.

The data which shows the overall dependence on automated machines in production plants showed that at the end of their most recent fiscal year, 11 out of the 13 auto giants across the world had more staff compared with the end of 2013.

Bloomberg data shows that the employee count of the companies combined stood at 3.1 million employees or 11 per cent more than four years earlier.

Bloomberg data shows that the employee count of the companies combined stood at 3.1 million employees or 11 per cent more than four years earlier.

Steve Man, an analyst from Bloomberg Intelligence in Hong Kong, states that such growth in growing economies such as China cites for cheaper labour compared to the higher upfront investment that automated machines demand. However, in developed countries, the scenario differs greatly with major automakers already been shifted to automated machines a long time ago and investing more on r&d as the industry evolves.

“There’s been a lot of growth in emerging markets, especially China, so that’s one reason automakers are adding staff,” Man said. “More staff is being added on the R&D side, with the push for autonomous, electric, connected vehicles.”

Reports suggest that three of the Chinese auto companies including SAIC Motor Corp., Dongfeng Motor Group and BYD Co. increased its staff count by 24 per cent

Reports suggest that three of the Chinese auto companies including SAIC Motor Corp., Dongfeng Motor Group and BYD Co. increased its staff count by 24 per cent.

Among the automakers whose staff count got smaller included General Motors which cut down its per cent to payroll by 18 per cent to 180,000 and Nissan Motor Co., which fell by 2.8 per cent to 139,000 workers. In the same breath, total vehicle production worldwide last year rose by 11 per cent to 97 million units, compared to 2013.