Inching closer to commercial flying vehicles, the Japanese authorities, through a government-backed campaign has decided to proceed with the project and has recruited companies such as Subaru, Uber and Boeing.

Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry had launched this project last month after a meeting that involved public agencies as well as private industry. This news comes after Japanese authorities realised how much the country lagged when it came to future-proofing its auto-industry depending on the progress that other nations have made in the field of autonomous driving and ride-hailing.

Inching closer to commercial flying vehicles, the Japanese authorities, through a government-backed campaign that has recruited companies such as Subaru, Uber and Boeing to proceed with the project

“Globally, there is a growing interest in what is called ‘flying cars’ that will enable such transportation services in the sky,” the trade ministry said in a statement after the first meeting. “Japan, too, aims to achieve speedier and more convenient transportation services for people and goods, while trying to create a new industry that can be competitive and profitable in world markets.”

Reports suggest that the ambitious project of aerial transportation by the Japanese authorities is less like a highway-safe automobile and more of a glorified drone. Typically with helicopter-like rotor and room for one or two passengers at a time.

Europe based aeronautical giant Airbus underwent a partnership with Audi and Italdesign to work on the Pop.Up concept, a vision of autonomous, electric urban air mobility.

Japan is, however, is not the first one who has aimed at an aerial mobility technology. Europe based aeronautical giant Airbus underwent a partnership with Audi and Italdesign to work on the Pop.Up concept, a vision of autonomous, electric urban air mobility. Similarly, Geely brought the US flying car startup Terrafugia while Uber has been hinting about launching its own aerial taxi service, UberAir.