Back in January this year, Bugatti unveiled the largest 3D-printed component made out of titanium. The brake-calliper was designed by the Italian automaker and manufactured for the likes of the Chiron. Following this, it has continued to test the calliper throughout the year before it enters production.

On the Chiron, we learn that the 3D-printed callipers will be installed in the front axle and will replace the current aluminium callipers.

While we are unclear if the callipers will make it to production anytime soon, Bugatti has given us a glimpse of just how extreme its test procedures are. The titanium calliper, in the video, is installed on a machine that mimics a car travelling at speeds up to 374kph. The engineers then apply the brakes to see how the 3D-printed component handles the pressure against the casted aluminium calliper.

The results speak for themselves as the calliper is seen to be intact even after being subjected to excruciating stress and temperatures that close in on 1093 degrees Celsius. The braking, as we can see, puts up quite a fireworks show as sparks can be seen the fly as the brake disc itself heats to a vivid orange glow. Amid this, the titanium unit holds its own.

The new component weighs just about 2.9kg, shedding almost 40 percent of weight over the current unit.

For the manufacturing of the calliper, Bugatti used four 400-watt lasers and over 45 hours of time to build it. Titanium powder is deposited by the layer until exactly 2,213 layers are present for the final product. This is then taken to the furnace in order to break and eliminate the residual stress. And the end result is a calliper that can take on 124kg of force applied to a square millimetre without any rupture.

On the Chiron, we learn that the 3D-printed callipers will be installed in the front axle and will replace the current aluminium callipers. The new component weighs just about 2.9kg, shedding almost 40 percent of weight over its current component. Bugatti, however, is just another vivid example of the future of additive manufacturing among automakers. The 3D-printed components prove useful with a lighter weight and more intricate designs.