Lamborghini’s work on the hybrid successor to the Aventador is still under wraps. This all-new model was rumoured to arrive somewhere between 2020 and 2022. New reports now suggest that the hypercar is codenamed the LB48H and is due next year.

Costing on the V12 electric hypercar was earlier reported by Autocar to be close to $2.6 million. However, a rather amusing detail about the car as said by Road & Track citing ‘sources familiar to Lamborghini’s plans’ was that the car will glow in the dark.

While we are unclear about any further details about the Tron-inspired lighting, the Lamborghini Terzo Millennio concept from 2017 reflects something similar to the aforementioned feature. The wheels, as well as the engine bay, illuminate Italian flag graphics along with the front fenders. These, however, does not completely complement the “glow in the dark” tag.

In 2017 the Terzo Millenio featured nascent supercapacitors tech that the Italian automaker had been developing with MIT

If the LB48H is supposed to sport such a feature, we might be looking at a new chapter among hypercars. Listing among the cons of the car, R&D officials in Italy stated that the car is expected to carry an additional 150 to 200kg, bemoaned due to the extra battery pack. By far, various reports that have speculated the car state that the flagship V12 hypercar will use supercapacitors instead of batteries that would provide an efficient lightweight solution.

As a push towards catering to the cities mandating a minimum all-electric range up to 50km, Lamborghini is expected to split its hybrid layout with an electric motor in charge of the front axle

In 2017 the Terzo Millenio featured nascent supercapacitor tech that the Italian automaker had been developing with MIT. While the supercapacitor technology calls for a lighter setup, a longer service life and the fact that it can discharge and recover energy at the same time, some of its downside comes in the form of low energy density when compared to lithium-ion batteries meaning that the LB48H could use a battery and a supercapacitor to work a 49-horsepower motor aiding a 789hp V12.

As we know it, the production V12 is expected to get a rather mundane solution. As a push towards catering to the cities mandating a minimum all-electric range up to 50km, Lamborghini is expected to split its hybrid layout with an electric motor in charge of the front axle. This eliminates a prop shaft and also sharpens the front axle response and torque vectoring.