Earlier this week, Lamborghini chairman and CEO Stefano Domenicali told Car Advice that it will cap its production at 8,000 cars in 2020.

Back in 2010, the Sant’Agata Bolognese automakers sold 1,302 cars worldwide, while its rival Ferrari showed impressive sales with 6,461 units. However, this was changed last year when Lamborghini broke all its records to report a 51 per cent rise in sales, delivering 5,750 cars.

The company believes that the cap maintains two post-sale hallmarks required to fuel its new-car sales: exclusivity and resale values. Ahead of this, Ferrari has been leading the way with public declarations of voluntary caps to maintain the brand name and the Italian bull is happy to follow its lead. Speaking to an Australian publication, Domenicali said: “I can also say that for us, Ferrari has always been a reference … as well as others in the super sports car segment, but we have already achieved higher residual values for our cars, especially with some of our older models.”

If Lamborghini manages to hustle a 40 per cent increase in deliveries this year, adding up to 2,300 more units, then in 2019 the carmaker will exceed the said cap by 50 units.

Half of the planned 8,000 models in the Italian carmaker’s lineup for 2020 has been marked out for the Urus, two-thirds of the remainder for the Huracan and the rest for the Aventador. It could be speculated that the price cap will apply only to the year 2020 though.

If Lamborghini manages to hustle a 40 per cent increase in deliveries this year, adding up to 2,300 more units, then in 2019 the carmaker will exceed the said cap by 50 units. This is not outside the realm of possibility for the Italians as this is the first full year of Urus sales. In 2013, Ferrari faced a similar situation when then-CEO of Ferrari Luca Montezemolo held production to under 7,000 units after delivering 7,318 models in 2012. After Sergio Marchionne took over Montezemolo in 2014 the 7,000 unit cap was retained.

The company believes that the cap maintains two post-sale hallmarks required to fuel its new-car sales: exclusivity and resale values.

Post the success of the Huracan GT3 EVO at the Rolex 24 at Daytona a year after the Huracan GT3 bagged a win in 2018, Lamborghini has been facing upward pressure to churn out more models. Up until now, Lamborghini Squadra Corse has built more than 200 customer racers. More pressingly, in November last year, speaking to Automotive News, Domenicali stated that the company was “planning to sell 4,500 to 5,000 units per year globally in the short term”. And this was ahead of the one-make series for the Urus ST-X concept facing huge demand.