Maserati is expected to shelve the GranTurismo as it prepares for the launch of a new model by the end of this year.

Citing an Australian Maserati Executive, Carsales on Tuesday reported that the company will end the production of GranTurismo by the end of this year. In addition to this, Maserati itself announced that the Modena plant making the Gran Turismo will face production line upgrades to prepare for a new model.

The Maserati GranTurismo and GranCabrio are both 11 years old, effectively the oldest cars on sale today.

General Manager of Maserati’s Australia and New Zealand operations, Glen Sealey told Carsales that dealers will be stocking down the remaining models until mid-2020. Reports suggest that the GranTurismo will be succeeded by Alfieri, Maserati’s all-new coupe, based on the space-frame chassis.

Ahead of this, a full-electric Alfieri produced alongside Ferrari was reportedly on the table. Additionally, Maserati’s own statement states that upgrading and renewal of the Modena production lines will begin later this year. The company mentioned, “a totally new model, a characteristically Maserati sports car” would enter pre-series production during the first half of 2020.

The shelving of GranTurismo comes a few weeks after the FCA-owned company announced a change in its market strategy. Amidst declining sales around the world, Maserati stated that it will now aim at shedding its image of a mass-market brand and ascend as a force to be reckoned with in luxury and performance car circles.

Maserati is currently reeling from multiple losses such as a substantial sales slump in China, problems caused by new WLTP emissions regulations.

New Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Mike Manley admitted that pairing up Alfa Romeo and Maserati under the same strategy was a mistake, resulting in the latter being treated “almost like a mass-market brand”. Manley has reconstituted Harald Wester to take the reins at Maserati and tasked him with installing a new management team and developing a revised plan. Wester previously led Maserati between 2008 and 2016.

Maserati is currently reeling from multiple losses such as a substantial sales slump in China, problems caused by new WLTP emissions regulations, and most importantly, lack of new models. The Maserati GranTurismo and GranCabrio are both 11 years old, effectively the oldest cars on sale today. The Quattroporte and Ghibli saloons are more than five years old, and the Levante has also not seen much traction past the two-year mark.