In an interview last week, Oliver Blume, CEO of Porsche AG, disclosed an interesting piece of information about the current 911’s range-topping variant. Porsche is working on electrifying the 911, and will not go down the conventional path of hybrids.

Blume told Top Gear, “We have said the next 911 will add a hybrid version. That will be the highest-performance 911 of all. So it won’t have the extra weight of batteries, it will be a non-plug-in hybrid. We have the experience to do that – look at the racing 919.”

This is the first time a Porsche 911 is being considered for electrification by its maker.

“We have said the next 911 will add a hybrid version. That will be the highest-performance 911 of all. So it won’t have the extra weight of batteries, it will be a non-plug-in hybrid. We have the experience to do that – look at the racing 919,” says Oliver Blume, CEO of Porsche AG.

911 product chief August Achleitner has confirmed that the hybrid 992 will follow Porsche’s electrified model formula, which sees the company fitting a disc-shaped electric motor between the sports car’s eight-speed PDK gearbox and boxer-six engine. This drivetrain is expected to be more powerful than the upcoming 2020 Porsche 911 Turbo S. Reports say the Turbo S will produce 641hp and 800Nm.

Porsche returned to Le Mans in 2016 with LMP1-class hybrid 919 EVO that claimed victory at the prestigious race. Since then, the company has been continually improving upon hybrid technology. Unlike roadgoing hybrids that focus on efficiency, the 911 will probably leverage the technology to put down even more performance.

The last 911 GT2 RS produced close to 700hp. It’s safe to say its 992-gen successor will offer even more power. If Porsche’s claims about the hybrid 911 being the highest-performing of all were to come true, that would mean we are looking at a version of the iconic sports car that could put down in excess of 800hp.

Porsche has extensive experience in hybrid technology through its Le Mans-winning 919 hybrid LMP1 race car.

However, Blume did say the 911 will be a “non-plug-in-hybrid”, which suggests that the electric motor’s role and power output in the drivetrain will be limited. Matching the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid’s 126-hp boost will be a difficult target to achieve in a smaller package. On the other hand, Porsche has amassed enough experience in motorsports to be able to make it happen.

There is no concrete timeframe as to when the hybrid 911 project will get the green light, but we can expect its announcement following the unveiling of the GT-spec trims.